women's human rights: Canada & the world



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When Ripa says “Everybody does it,” she proves her own point. In attempting to explain away Franco’s behaviour, she reminds us all that this situation (and worse, much worse) is all too common, that it happens around us, to our family and friends and to strangers on the subway all the time. And that that’s fine with us. Because James Franco is a “victim” of social media, here. Because when a teenage girl is drugged and raped, CNN bemoans the “ruined” “promising futures” of her rapists. Because when Daisy Coleman tried to speak out against her attacker, her entire family faced further harassment online and in their daily lives. Franco’s clumsy propositioning of a teenage fan is not the same thing as the Steubenville rapes or Woody Allen’s child molestation or David Letterman’s alleged longstanding affairs with female staff members, but all of it intersects to form a narrative telling young women that society doesn’t care about their side of things. That this is nothing, it happens to everybody, “dont tell.”




tinyhouseamerica:

horny-grandma:

fistfightingthefuture:

shotstothestars:

milk-roses:

I am ashamed to say that this was taking place yesterday at Arizona State University. This man proclaimed all day to everyone who passed by that he believed if girls wore reveling clothing out or choose to drink alcohol, that they deserved to be raped.

My school attracts some sick people.

What is this shit? I can’t believe I missed this guy, if I would have seen him there’s no rhetoric that could’ve saved him.

Good ole brother dean, please come give it to him Heston

This happens at U of A as well.  Brother Dean and the pastor visit the college and the local high schools.  Students, teachers, staff, and visitors are all bombarded with a man telling us that we deserve rape and hell. It’s been going on for several years and nobody will stop them.  

tinyhouseamerica:

horny-grandma:

fistfightingthefuture:

shotstothestars:

milk-roses:

I am ashamed to say that this was taking place yesterday at Arizona State University. This man proclaimed all day to everyone who passed by that he believed if girls wore reveling clothing out or choose to drink alcohol, that they deserved to be raped.

My school attracts some sick people.

What is this shit? I can’t believe I missed this guy, if I would have seen him there’s no rhetoric that could’ve saved him.

Good ole brother dean, please come give it to him Heston

This happens at U of A as well.  Brother Dean and the pastor visit the college and the local high schools.  Students, teachers, staff, and visitors are all bombarded with a man telling us that we deserve rape and hell. It’s been going on for several years and nobody will stop them.  


Men want what they want.

So much of our culture caters to giving men what they want. A high school student invites model Kate Upton to attend his prom, and he’s congratulated for his audacity. A male fan at a Beyoncé concert reaches up to the stage to slap her ass because her ass is there, her ass is magnificent, and he wants to feel it. The science fiction fandom community is once again having a heated discussion, across the Internet, about the ongoing problem of sexual harassment at conventions — countless women are telling all manner of stories about how, without their consent, they are groped, ogled, lured into hotel rooms under false pretenses, physically lifted off the ground, and more.

But men want what they want. We should all lighten up.

It’s hard not to feel humorless as a woman and a feminist, to recognize misogyny in so many forms, some great and some small, and know you’re not imagining things. It’s hard to be told to lighten up because if you lighten up any more, you’re going to float the fuck away. The problem is not that one of these things is happening, it’s that they are all happening, concurrently and constantly.

These are just songs. They are just jokes. They are just movies. It’s just a hug. They’re just breasts. Smile, you’re beautiful. Can’t a man pay you a compliment? In truth, this is all a symptom of a much more virulent cultural sickness — one where women exist to satisfy the whims of men, one where a woman’s worth is consistently diminished or entirely ignored.


11:30 am, reblogged from  by padaviya51,118 notes

I do consider “rape culture” to be a useful and accurate way of describing the way in which sexual violence has been normalized and sexualized in our culture. There is simply no denying that, when we see male students “joking” about raping female students, as we did recently at the University of Ottawa, when fraternities are untouchable on campus despite the fact that the “Greek scene” is a cesspool of toxic masculinity and sexual violence, when students at Canadian universities participate in “rape chants” during frosh week while fellow students are actually being raped on campus, when violent pornography that depicts sexual violence is defended as “just a fantasy,” or when we learn that acting out rape scenes is a way for us to recover from our own trauma, when women are afraid to walk alone at night, when women are afraid to be home alone at night in their own homes – this is a rape culture. We’re living it, every day.


lauriehalseanderson:

policymic:

Do you still need more proof of rape culture?

As Noam Chomsky once pointed out for Z Magazine, old media types from the institutional bodies like American Enterprise Institute tend to regurgitate the same ideas with a reliability that is equally impressive and infuriating. While assuring the public that rape is a terrible crime, writers like Caroline Kitchens and Heather McDonald of right-wing think tank The Manhattan Institute try to claim that feminists have blown this whole rape culture thing way out of proportion.

Apparently, many women disagree. On Tuesday there were more than 1 million responses on the #RapeCultureIsWhen hashtag started by a frustrated Zerlina Maxwell in response to these right-wing narratives. 

Read moreFollow policymic

Keep speaking up!!!!!

SIGNAL BOOST!!!


Rape culture is something that men should care about not because it might affect them, but because it affects anyone at all. Men should care about women’s safety, full stop, without having the concept somehow relate back to them. Everyone should care about everyone else’s well-being – that’s what good people are supposed to do.




phoolcat:

muchanimal-veryfeminism-wow:

misandry-mermaid:

mensrightsactivism:

This was actually said by a prominent member of the Men’s rights community on Reddit who then proceeded to get 24(!) upvotes:

Wearing a skirt has consequences. If we use state violence to protect women from the consequences of her choice to wear a skirt, we remove her agency. This man didn’t assault her, didn’t touch her… all he did was take a picture of what her choice in clothing exposed to the public.
How is that criminal to the point of deserving of state violence upon him?
This is saying that protecting women from the consequences of their choices in clothing is more important than men’s freedom.

Now that’s what I call a real men’s rights issue. Could you expect anything less from a hate group?
Screencap (and more info) over at the always excellent Man Boobz.

Mens Rights Activism: hard at work defending sexual harassment.

men’s rights: where a man’s right to sexually harass a woman based on whether they’ve decided she meets some standard of “modesty” she has no say in, should supersede a woman’s right to basic personal boundaries and human decency.
men’s rights: when a woman freely making the choice to do whatever she wants with her own body, not affecting anyone else in any way, needs to “accept the consequences of her actions”- but men who choose to harass women shouldn’t have to face any consequences for THAT choice, even though it hurts someone else.
men’s rights: a “movement” (purposeless online misogynistic circlejerk) where rights are defined as behaviors that you feel entitled to carry out without being even mildly criticized for it, no matter how many other people are negatively impacted by that behavior.
men’s rights: where being asked to show basic human decency towards women is “infringing” upon a man’s freedom not to do that, even though that is how a society is supposed to fucking function. because fuck them, you shouldn’t have to consider other human beings when you make your choices. how dare they?
men’s rights: you got yours (basic human rights). so fuck everybody else. now, let’s talk about how poor people don’t deserve to earn a living wage, because then the services you use every day might cost you an extra $20 per year.

men’s rights: a movement dedicated to preserving and forwarding the rights of men to continue the subjugation and abuse of women.

phoolcat:

muchanimal-veryfeminism-wow:

misandry-mermaid:

mensrightsactivism:

This was actually said by a prominent member of the Men’s rights community on Reddit who then proceeded to get 24(!) upvotes:

Wearing a skirt has consequences. If we use state violence to protect women from the consequences of her choice to wear a skirt, we remove her agency. This man didn’t assault her, didn’t touch her… all he did was take a picture of what her choice in clothing exposed to the public.

How is that criminal to the point of deserving of state violence upon him?

This is saying that protecting women from the consequences of their choices in clothing is more important than men’s freedom.

Now that’s what I call a real men’s rights issue. Could you expect anything less from a hate group?

Screencap (and more info) over at the always excellent Man Boobz.

Mens Rights Activism: hard at work defending sexual harassment.

men’s rights: where a man’s right to sexually harass a woman based on whether they’ve decided she meets some standard of “modesty” she has no say in, should supersede a woman’s right to basic personal boundaries and human decency.

men’s rights: when a woman freely making the choice to do whatever she wants with her own body, not affecting anyone else in any way, needs to “accept the consequences of her actions”- but men who choose to harass women shouldn’t have to face any consequences for THAT choice, even though it hurts someone else.

men’s rights: a “movement” (purposeless online misogynistic circlejerk) where rights are defined as behaviors that you feel entitled to carry out without being even mildly criticized for it, no matter how many other people are negatively impacted by that behavior.

men’s rights: where being asked to show basic human decency towards women is “infringing” upon a man’s freedom not to do that, even though that is how a society is supposed to fucking function. because fuck them, you shouldn’t have to consider other human beings when you make your choices. how dare they?

men’s rights: you got yours (basic human rights). so fuck everybody else. now, let’s talk about how poor people don’t deserve to earn a living wage, because then the services you use every day might cost you an extra $20 per year.

men’s rights: a movement dedicated to preserving and forwarding the rights of men to continue the subjugation and abuse of women.


Rape culture means more than a culture in which rape is routine. Rape culture involves the systematic silencing of victims even as women and children are instructed to behave like potential victims at all times. In order to preserve rape culture, society at large has to believe two different things at once. Firstly, that women and children lie about rape, but that they should also act as if rape will be the result if they get into a strange car, walk down a strange street or wear a sexy outfit. Secondly, if it happens, it’s their own fool fault for not respecting the unwritten rules.

This paradox involves significant mental gymnastics. But as more and more people come forward with accusations, as the pattern of historical and ongoing abuse of power becomes harder to ignore, the paradox gets harder to maintain. We are faced with two alternatives: either women and children are lying about rape on an industrial, organised scale, or rape and sexual abuse are endemic in this society, and have been for centuries. Facing up to the reality of the latter is a painful prospect.


i-once-had-a-guy-tell-me:

[TW Rape]

I once had a guy tell me at a party not to drink because another guy had said that he was going to get me really drunk and fuck me while I don’t know left from right.

(submitted by anonymous)


I think part of the reason we have trouble drawing the line ‘it’s not okay to force someone into sexual activity’ is that in many ways, forcing people to do things is part of our culture in general. Cut that shit out of your life. If someone doesn’t want to go to a party, try a new food, get up and dance, make small talk at the lunchtable—that’s their right. Stop the ‘aww c’mon’ and ‘just this once’ and the games where you playfully force someone to play along. Accept that no means no—all the time.

The Pervocracy: Consent culture. (via lookoutsideyourself)

Wow. I had never thought about it like that. Good point Tumblr quote. Good point.

(via takealookatyourlife)

More

"It’s good to practice drawing your own boundaries outside of the bedroom, too.  It can be shockingly empowering to say something as small as "no, I don’t want to sit with you."  "No, you can’t have my phone number."  "I love hugs, but please ask me first."  It’s good practice for the big stuff.  Simply learning to put your mind in the frame of "this person does not want me to say no to them, and they will resist me doing it, but I’m doing it anyway” is a big, important deal.”

(via caseyballvins)


04:30 pm, reblogged from  by padaviya2,079 notes

Horrible realization about men creepshots gave me that actually has me in tears

theroguefeminist:

It’s not about sex - they have porn, they have as much fucking porn as they could possibly ask for

they have billboards and ads and primetime tv shows and hollywood movies and websites free videos magazines they have porn channels porn movies with sexy images of women

they have girls on websites who are paid to webcam with them

there are girls who post sexy pics of themselves online for them

none of this is enough, none of this is, at the bottom of it all, what they want

creepshots specifically says this isn’t enough - they don’t want pics of girls knowingly posing (i.e. giving consent)

they want to violate, they want to rape, they want to own every woman walking down the fucking street

they want your teenager daughter, they want your mom, they want you

when you don’t know it, when you can’t say no, when you’re on the bus, when you’re walking down the street, when you’re at the beach

they get off on your violation, they want more proof that women exist for them and them alone

it’s sexy because it’s embarrassing, humiliating; they say it themselves

this is rape culture in its purest form

because women saying yes on screen, women saying yes to their faces, saying yes on their computers, on their phones is not what they want

that’s not “hot” enough

what’s hot is violating your consent, what’s hot is demeaning you, what’s hot is owning a piece of you against your will

and they won’t stop until we are all pornography


(TW: RAPE) If a woman has (the right to abortion), why shouldn’t a man be free to use his superior strength to force himself on a woman? At least the rapist’s pursuit of sexual freedom doesn’t (in most cases) result in anyone’s death.

A Republican elected official in Maine actually said this. But what war on women? (via whitegirlpolitickin)

I can’t….

(via stfueverything)

I think this is something I’m going to point people to when I tell them that the pro-life position is directly related to rape culture. 

(via stfufauxminists)

He’s a disgusting human being… look up his statements on homosexuality and HIV sometime….

(via choosechoice)

Wow. Talk about insight into anti-choice theory.

(via rhrealitycheck)

(Source: )



When I was seventeen and preparing to leave for university, my mother’s only brother saw fit to give me some advice.
“Just don’t be an idiot, kid,” he told me, “and don’t ever forget that boys and girls can never just be friends.”
I laughed and answered, “I’m not too worried. And I don’t really think all guys are like that.”

When I was eighteen and the third annual advent of the common cold was rolling through residence like a pestilent fog, a friend texted me asking if there was anything he could do to help.
I told him that if he could bring me up some vitamin water that would be great, if it wasn’t too much trouble.
That semester I learned that human skin cells replace themselves every three to five weeks. I hoped that in a month, maybe I’d stop feeling the echoes of his touch; maybe my new skin would feel cleaner.
It didn’t. But I stood by what I said. Not all guys are like that.

When I was nineteen and my roommate decided the only way to celebrate the end of midterms was to get wasted at a club, I humoured her.
Four drinks, countless leers and five hands up my skirt later, I informed her I was ready to leave.
“I get why you’re upset,” she told me on the walk home, “but you have to tolerate that sort of thing if you want to have any fun. And really, not all guys are like that.”

(Age nineteen also saw me propositioned for casual sex by no fewer than three different male friends, and while I still believe that guys and girls can indeed be just friends, I was beginning to see my uncle’s point.)

When I was twenty and a stranger that started chatting to me in my usual cafe asked if he could walk with me (since we were going the same way and all), I accepted.
Before we’d even made it three blocks he was pulling me into an alleyway and trying to put his hands up my shirt. “You were staring,” he laughed when I asked what the fuck he was doing (I wasn’t), “I’m just taking pity.”
But not all guys are like that.

I am twenty one and a few days ago a friend and I were walking down the street. A car drove by with the windows down, and a young man stuck his head out and whistled as they passed. I ignored it, carrying on with the conversation.
My friend did not. “Did you know those people?” He asked.
“Not at all,” I answered.
Later when we sat down to eat he got this thoughtful look on his face. When I asked what was wrong he said, “You know not all guys do that kind of thing, right? We’re not all like that.”
As if he were imparting some great profound truth I’d never realized before. My entire life has been turned around, because now I’ve been enlightened: not all guys are like that.

No. Not all guys are. But enough are. Enough that I am uncomfortable when a man sits next to me on the bus. Enough that I will cross to the other side of the street if I see a pack of guys coming my way. Enough that even fleeting eye contact with a male stranger makes my insides crawl with unease. Enough that I cannot feel safe alone in a room with some of my male friends, even ones I’ve known for years. Enough that when I go out past dark for chips or milk or toilet paper, I carry a knife, I wear a coat that obscures my figure, I mimic a man’s gait. Enough that three years later I keep the story of that day to myself, when the only thing that saved me from being raped was a right hook to the jaw and a threat to scream in a crowded dorm, because I know what the response will be.

I live my life with the everburning anxiety that someone is going to put their hands on me regardless of my feelings on the matter, and I’m not going to be able to stop them. I live with the knowledge that statistically one in three women have experienced a sexual assault, but even a number like that can’t be trusted when we are harassed into silence. I live with the learned instinct, the ingrained compulsion to keep my mouth shut to jeers and catcalls, to swallow my anger at lewd suggestions and crude gestures, to put up my walls against insults and threats. I live in an environment that necessitates armouring myself against it just to get through a day peacefully, and I now view that as normal. I have adapted to extreme circumstances and am told to treat it as baseline. I carry this fear close to my heart, rooted into my bones, and I do so to keep myself unharmed.

So you can tell me that not all guys are like that, and you’d even be right, but that isn’t the issue anymore. My problem is not that I’m unaware of the fact that some guys are perfectly civil, decent, kind—my problem is simply this:

In a world where this cynical overcaution is the only thing that ensures my safety, I’m no longer willing to take the risk.

r.d. (via vonmoire)

(Source: elferinge)


04:30 pm, reblogged from Rabble by padaviya116,714 notes

projectunbreakable:

nine photographs portraying quotes said to sexual assault survivors by police officers, attorneys, and other authority figures

more info about project unbreakable here

original tumblr here

previously: nine photographs portraying quotes said to sexual assault survivors by their friends/family

02:00 pm, reblogged from  by padaviya242,775 notes



stfufauxminists:

therearecertainshadesoflimelight:

kathythewriter:

This is Stephen King tweeting that Dylan Farrow’s New York Times essay about the sexual abuse she suffered at age seven by her adopted father Woody Allen had “an element of palpable bitchery.” 
Just in case you never want to read anything by the fucker again.

So now women who are sexually abused as children by a trusted father figure have to be nice and polite when they talk about the trauma? I’m gonna be blunt here. I know King has a lot of fans. I’ve often found him to be an insufferable misogynist. This crosses the line even further. Done with this asshole and everything he’s ever written.

Fuck Stephen King forever.

stfufauxminists:

therearecertainshadesoflimelight:

kathythewriter:

This is Stephen King tweeting that Dylan Farrow’s New York Times essay about the sexual abuse she suffered at age seven by her adopted father Woody Allen had “an element of palpable bitchery.”

Just in case you never want to read anything by the fucker again.

So now women who are sexually abused as children by a trusted father figure have to be nice and polite when they talk about the trauma? I’m gonna be blunt here. I know King has a lot of fans. I’ve often found him to be an insufferable misogynist. This crosses the line even further. Done with this asshole and everything he’s ever written.

Fuck Stephen King forever.